A Typical Toddle.

These titles are getting to be a bit of a stretch, aren’t they? Haha.

It’s been a hot week for us here in Western Australia. Apparently the north of the state missed out on their hottest day since records began by just 0.2 of a degree. I’m sure the people living there felt the difference! Even here on the south coast it was warmer than usual. I wonder what it will be like in five or ten years, when we’ve completely changed our approach to global warming and are all on renewable, sustainable energy? (Well, I can dream, can’t I?)

Hope your Sunday is an interesting one – I’m off to have a cup of tea and a piece of banana-berry-bread with the Handsome Sidekick!

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The Frequent Footslog.

Well. I have never in my life used the word ‘footslog’ and probably am unlikely to do so again. I mean, finding links once a week is hardly a slog, really.

Anyway. We’ve got two weeks left of summer holidays and suddenly we seem to be running out of time to do everything. It always seems like that at the beginning of a long break, doesn’t it? You imagine all these things you’ll do, and then time gets away from you. But I think the children are looking forward to going back to school, and I am too – in the nicest possible way, of course! It’s exciting to start a new school year. Before then, though, we’ve friends to see and icey poles to eat and long summer afternoons to enjoy.

Have an excellent Sunday, everyone!

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Hungry?

Fortuitously, the post I was going to write last week is even more relevant this week, considering that yesterday (and in some parts of the world, still today) was World Food Day. This year, the emphasis is on family and subsistence farming, and how they help to combat, among other things, hunger.

The trouble with talking about hunger, though, is that many of us in the developed world see it as a problem for others. When food shortages happen in other places, it can be devastating, but here, most of us are in the position where we don’t have to worry too deeply. Potatoes are too expensive? We can buy pasta instead. We have alternatives. In fact, most of us don’t know what it is like to go hungry, so much that there is a shame associated with not having enough to eat, especially if it is the case that you cannot feed your children.

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Fair Go, Mate!

This week’s path: ethic is by guest blogger, Michael Lloyd. Michael is a retired farmer, an Anglican deacon and is currently completing his Bachelor of Arts at the University of Western Australia.

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Australians have always seen themselves as an egalitarian mob. From the time Europeans arrived in 1788 to establish a penal colony, they saw a classless society as desirable – none of the old English class system for us! We expected from, and gave to, everyone the benefit of doubt – a Fair go, Mate! And from this evolved the ‘Tall Poppy Syndrome’, whereby anyone who considered themselves a ‘bit above their neighbours’ was ‘taken down a peg or two’ – the tall poppy cut down! It seemed the attitude was that if you had done exceptionally well in an undertaking, you had probably cheated at best or broken the law at worst.

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