The Week Links: in which our blogger deftly avoids the Antarctic Vortex by living in Western Australia.

Mind you, it’s still pretty cold here, and all the Offspring are sick with a cold and as such, are a joy and delight to be around (no, they’re not; they’re miserable and sad, and I feel sorry for them and want them to feel better, if only so I can get something done during the day, and have a full night’s sleep).

All I can say is: thank goodness for tea, and a working oven. Hot food and hot beverages… I feel very blessed.

Wherever you are this Sunday, I hope the weather treats you kindly, or failing that, that you enjoy this week’s links.

I’ve been watching the Greek financial crisis with some sadness and interest. I can’t help feeling that among all the political and economic discussions, the everyday person in Greece gets forgotten. How do people support themselves when they can’t get work; how do they feed themselves? And I know that financial problems are complicated, and that when it comes to countries bailing out other countries, there are a host of issues to consider, but I’m sad that Germany, having witnessed firsthand the way that economic pressures can be a driver to push the population to the political right, is a major player in implementing harsh economic penalties for Greece.

* * * * *

Continuing on the money-theme, it always strikes me as somewhat illogical, and perhaps even insidious, how governments will promote their achievements in saving money, only for it to later emerge that those savings are essentially rendered null and void by the spending in other areas — in order to fix the problem created by the ‘savings’. It’s robbing Peter to pay Paul, and it’s ridiculous. Especially when it has to do with the lives of women and children who are experiencing abuse and domestic violence. 

* * * * *

I understand that Pope Francis has his (many) detractors. There are those who resent the way he’s attempting a more modern and realistic focus for the Catholic church. There are those who, despite agreeing with what he says, think he is all talk and no action. But I admire the fact that there is at least talk. Now, in this case, it remains to be seen if that is followed up by action, to ensure that indigenous peoples can achieve political representation and also the right to access their own lands.

* * * * *

Finally, I really enjoyed reading these stories of a group of centenarians interviewed by the ABC. My Offspring are a little obsessed with the idea of (my) living to 100, and as much as I love that they want me around for another 60-odd years, I also find it incredible that people are living to this age, and that they are still healthy. If I could ensure that this was going to be the case for me, too, then sign me up! I’ll even post a special path: ethic piece on my 100th birthday!

4 thoughts on “The Week Links: in which our blogger deftly avoids the Antarctic Vortex by living in Western Australia.

  1. Pingback: The Week Links: in which our blogger deftly avoids the Antarctic Vortex by living in Western Australia. | ugiridharaprasad

  2. Well done, Rebecca. Love the

    All I can say is: thank goodness for tea, and a working oven. Hot food and hot beverages… I feel very blessed.

    Take care of the Offsprings and yourself.

    • Thank you. Finally, finally, they seem to be getting better. Phew! I really empathise with those parents who have children with special needs or chronic conditions which require a high level of care. After only two weeks of needy Offspring, I’m really looking forward for them to be back at school so I can get a rest!

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