Write Idea, Wrong Execution.

I read a post the other day called ‘Why I Put My Husband Before Our Kids.’

It’s not the kind of thing I usually read, but I was curious, because I don’t, actually, put the Handsome Sidekick before our Offspring, and I wondered whether the article might have something interesting to say about why I should.

Apparently, it’s written in response to another article, which I also wouldn’t normally read, especially given the advertisements for other articles interspersed in the text (7 Sex Positions Men Love/I’m Cheating On My Husband… Am I A Bad Person?/How to Kiss Well …no, I am not making these up).

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Who Cares What They Think?

A couple of months ago, I took Fourth Offspring for a late night jaunt down to the hospital. He’d been playing outside with his siblings in the afternoon, and had fallen—as he has, numerous times before and since—and his arm was hurting him. He’s not very verbal (he isn’t quite two years old yet) but it seemed like his wrist was sore, and even after icing and painkillers, it still was bothering him. So we went to Emergency.

I was a little reluctant to take him.

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Stand Tall, Walk Tall.

Did you know that lower back pain is now such a significant issue for so many, that the Medical Journal of Australia has considered whether it should be added to the list of National Priority Health Areas in this country? Apparently, up to 80% of Australians will suffer from lower back pain in their lifetime, and for a few of them, it causes considerable disability. Even for those whose pain only lasts a short while, it can be considerably debilitating, and costs millions to the community in lost production.

Not to mention, you know, the pain.

 

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Fair Go, Mate!

This week’s path: ethic is by guest blogger, Michael Lloyd. Michael is a retired farmer, an Anglican deacon and is currently completing his Bachelor of Arts at the University of Western Australia.

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Australians have always seen themselves as an egalitarian mob. From the time Europeans arrived in 1788 to establish a penal colony, they saw a classless society as desirable – none of the old English class system for us! We expected from, and gave to, everyone the benefit of doubt – a Fair go, Mate! And from this evolved the ‘Tall Poppy Syndrome’, whereby anyone who considered themselves a ‘bit above their neighbours’ was ‘taken down a peg or two’ – the tall poppy cut down! It seemed the attitude was that if you had done exceptionally well in an undertaking, you had probably cheated at best or broken the law at worst.

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